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Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Atlantic slave trade and slave life in the Americas found in the catalog.

The Atlantic slave trade and slave life in the Americas

Jerome S. Handler

The Atlantic slave trade and slave life in the Americas

a visual record

by Jerome S. Handler

  • 190 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and The Digital Media Lab at the University of Virginia Library in [Charlottesville, Va.?] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa.,
  • United States.
    • Subjects:
    • Slave trade -- History -- Pictorial works.,
    • Slavery -- Africa.,
    • Slavery -- United States.

    • About the Edition

      Hundreds of images, selected from a wide range of sources, most of them dating from the period of slavery, serve as a tool and a resource that can be used by teachers, researchers, students, and the general public who are interested in the experiences of Africans who were enslaved and transported to the Americas and the lives of their descendants in the slave societies of the New World.

      Edition Notes

      Other titlesSlave life in the Americas, Slavery images
      StatementJerome S. Handler and Michael L. Tuite Jr.
      GenrePictorial works.
      ContributionsTuite, Michael L., Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and Public Policy., Digital Media Lab (University of Virginia)
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHT975
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3379329M
      LC Control Number2004540226
      OCLC/WorldCa50240016

      On Febru , the British Parliament passed the Slave Trade Act, which abolished the trading of slaves across the Atlantic Ocean. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth century, millions of human beings were kidnapped and shipped to Brazil, the Caribbean or the United States to work as slaves, mostly in plantations. My Family’s Slave. She asked my parents about it in a roundabout way a couple of years into our life in America. Her mother had fallen ill (with what I would later learn was dysentery), and.

      Slave trading was a major feature of Jewish economic life in Surinam which as a major stopping-off point in the triangular trade. Both North American and Caribbean Jews played a key role in this commerce: records of a slave sale in reveal that the ten largest Jewish purchasers (10, guilders) spent more than 25 percent of the total funds. At a time when the Atlantic slave trade had already assumed horrific dimensions, when the decennial imports into the Americas had probably reached a quarter of a million and were still rapidly increasing, two of the most powerful organs of the Papacy – the Holy Office and the Congregation of Propaganda Fide – were called upon to consider.

      This collection of more than 1, images depicts the enslavement of Africans, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and slave life in the New World. Images are arranged in 18 categories, including pre-Colonial Africa, capture of slaves, maps, slave ships, plantation scenes, physical punishment, music, free people of color, family life, religion, marketing, and emancipation. Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society Suriname in the Atlantic World, Aviva Ben-Ur. pages | 6 x 9 | 21 illus. Cloth | ISBN | $s | Outside the Americas £ Ebook editions are available from selected online vendors A volume in the series Early Modern Americas View table of contents and excerpt "In Jewish Autonomy in a Slave Society, Aviva Ben-Ur contributes.


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The Atlantic slave trade and slave life in the Americas by Jerome S. Handler Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas: a Visual Record | Library of Congress. The approximately 1, images in this collection have been selected from a wide range of sources, most of them dating from the period of slavery.

This collection is envisioned as a tool and a resource that can be used by teachers, researchers, students, and the general public - in brief, anyone interested in. The Atlantic Slave Trade is an important part of history of several nations: great part of Africa of course, the nations in America who were immmersed in this trade as buyers and those European countries who had control of the trade to its by:   Hundreds of images, selected from a wide range of sources, most of them dating from the period of slavery, serve as a tool and a resource that can be used by teachers, researchers, students, and the general public who are interested in the experiences of Africans who were enslaved and transported to the Americas and the lives of their descendants in the slave societies of the New World.

Reconstructing the transatlantic slave trade from an extensive archive of new research, Walvin seeks to understand and describe how the trade began in Africa, the terrible ordeals experienced there by people sold into slavery, and the scars that remain on the continent today/5(12).

Between andapproximately eleven million black slaves were carried from Africa to the Americas to work on plantations, in mines, or as servants in houses. The Slave Trade is alive with villains and heroes and illuminated by eyewitness ed on: Febru   s Though the Atlantic slave trade was abolished over a year period ending with Portugal’s ban on slave trading, legal abolition did not end the still profitable trade.

It continued illegally well into the 19th century. The Clotilda, the last known slave ship, sneaked slaves into Mobile, Alabama in the summer of For more than a hundred years, even serious students of the history of slavery believed the number of African slaves brought to the Americas was between 15 to 20 million.

Then, inPhilip D. Curtin questioned those numbers in his book, The Atlantic Slave Trade: a Census. See Article History. Alternative Title: Atlantic slave trade.

Transatlantic slave trade, segment of the global slave trade that transported between 10 million and 12 million enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas from the 16th to the 19th century.

It was the second of three stages of the so-called triangular trade, in which arms, textiles, and wine were shipped from Europe to Africa, slaves. The Atlantic slave trade, transatlantic slave trade, or Euro-American slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly to the slave trade regularly used the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from the 16th to the 19th vast majority of those who were enslaved and transported in the transatlantic slave.

The last living former slave in Fairmont, West Virginia: Matilda McCrear: January The last known survivor of the Clotilda in –, the last trans-Atlantic slave ship to arrive in America from Africa: Redoshi: The next to last known survivor of the Clotilda, the last slave ship to arrive in America: Cudjoe Lewis: The Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas is an excellent database.

Scholars of the Atlantic slave system will be familiar with many of the images. In contrast, a recent pamphlet on the Atlantic slave trade that was published by the American Historical Association as an aid to scholars and teachers cites four sources that date from   The trans-Atlantic slave trade, which began as early as the 15th century, introduced a system of slavery that was commercialized, racialized and inherited.

Black people in America. Enslaved Africans for the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade were initially sourced in Senegambia and the Windward Coast.

Around the trade moved to west-central Africa (the Kingdom of the Kongo and neighboring Angola). The transport of enslaved people from Africa to the Americas forms the middle passageof the triangular trade.

Debates over the economic, social, and political meaning of slavery and the slave trade have persisted for over two hundred years. The Atlantic Slave Trade brings clarity and critical insight to the subject. In fourteen essays, leading scholars consider the nature and impact of the transatlantic slave trade and assess its meaning for the people transported and for those who owned them.

This book is a much-needed contribution to the history of Atlantic slavery and early modern West Africa that uses Danish sources to great effect. It'd be useful for graduate students and professors in history as well as for undergraduate classes on the history of slavery or premodern s: 7.

Patrick Manning, the author of "The Slave Trade," estimates that about 12 million slaves entered the Atlantic trade between the 16th and 19th century, and about million died on board ships (others have put the estimate of ship deaths at million), 4 million. What separates the Atlantic slave trade from any other slave trade is the race language established with it later in the Americas, it discriminates against a whole group of people on the basis of their skin color and forced many non-slave Africans in a system of verbal and physical abuse.

Introduction. The slave trade was one of the earliest and the most capital-intensive forms of Atlantic interaction.

The largest intercontinental migration in history before the mids, this forced transportation of enslaved Africans repopulated the Americas and. The Atlantic slave trade had a profound impact on both Africa and the Americas. In Africa, numerous cultures lost generations of their fittest members—their young and able—to European traders and plantation owners.

In addition, countless African families were torn apart. Many of. The slave trade was the business of acquiring, transporting and selling human beings, i.e., how they became slaves. This is a great list for self-education on the slave experience.

It is relatively useless as a focused resource for finding books -- e.g., Thomas' The Slave Trade and Northrup's The Atlantic Slave Trade (which are here) or William's Capitalism & Slavery (which isn't) -- on the Atlantic Slave Trade.Less than 5% traveled to the Northern American States formally held by the British.

Senegambia, the Slave Coast (Bight of Benin), and the Bight of Biafra exported each approximately % of the total of the slaves.

Central Africa, where the slave trade lasted longer, contributed approximately for 29%.The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on Economies, Societies and Peoples in Africa, the Americas, and Europe [Joseph E.

Inikori, Stanley L. Engerman, Martin A. Klein and Jan Hogendorn]. Debates over the economic, social, and political meaning of slavery.